Avoid client timeout on WebAPI call

If a WebAPI service takes a long time to complete, the caller, the client side, may timeout waiting for a response. There are several options to solve this issue, you can increase the timeout limit on the client side and web server side, or use a more persistent connection method like WebSocket and SignalR.

Here I propose a different way to avoid the timeout issue that allows the clients side to proactively check the result instead of passively waiting. The idea is pretty intuitive – since the client side times out on waiting for a response, why don’t just disconnect and check back the result later? So the solution is to disconnect with the client side as soon as the request is received and a WebAPI service is provided to enable client to check for the status of the processing. This way the client does not need to keep the connection open until the processing completes or times out. It can simply calls back every 5 seconds to check the result of the processing.

Here I am going to provide some sample code on how to achieve this. First, we create a Task class

public class Task
{
   public string TaskID;
   public Request Request;
   public Status Status;
   public Result Result;

   public void Execute(){
   // Do all sort of calculation and processing here
   // When done, sets the Status of the task to Finished.
   }
}

We then create a class to store tasks and to handle creation, retrieval, and deletion of tasks.

public class TaskManager
{
   private static List<Task> _TaskList = new List<Task>();
   // Create a new instance of Task object
   // and start a new thread to run this task
   public static Result CreateNewTask(Request request){
      var task = New Task(){
                TaskID =  System.Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
                .....
                };
      _TaskList.add(task);
      Thread thread = new Thread(task.Execute);
      task.Status = Status.Processing
      thread.start;
   }
   // This is also useful for purging tasks
   public static void RemoveTask(string taskID)
   public static Task GetTaskByID(string taskID)
}

Up to this point, we have our ‘backend’ built. Now we are going to create a WebAPI method to accept the request from the client side and a method for client side to check a task’s status:

[HttpPost]
public Result ProcessRequest(Request request){
// Submit a request which will be created as a task
// Return the TaskID back to client
}

[HttpGet]
public Result CheckStatus(String taskID){
// Call this every few seconds to check result
}

In this post I shared an idea to avoid client side timeout when calling WebAPI. We chose an approach that enables client side to check the result actively. Although it makes the client side a bit more complex, it is a reliable way to handle WebAPI calls that run a long time and also provides much more flexibility to the client side.

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One thought on “Avoid client timeout on WebAPI call

  1. Jonas Jakobsson says:

    There might be infrequent problems due to app pool recycling. Like when you start a task before a recycle and check the status afterwards.

    So I propose that you store TaskID and other state in persistent storage, like sql server.
    Also add a timestamp for when the task is started.
    Then in each CheckStatus call you check the status and report it back. If the timestamp is too old you modify the status to timed out.
    You will have to handle state in the task as well. Like what to do when you have completed the task and the task is already recorded as being timed out.

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